One prim clock, revisited

I have more or less dropped my attempts at making a single-prim analog clock, until I have abruptly bumped into a solution, used expressly for this purpose in the Japanese lands. All credit for this trick goes to kit Pizzicato, who sells them under the label *chronokit* — whether the original inventor of the trick is the maker of the clock, I don’t know, but, I’ve figured out how they did it and am going to tell anyone who cares, now. 🙂

To the left is the original, my replica of the prim is to the right.

To the left is the original, my replica of the prim is to the right.

The mystery shape is a Ring type prim, with around 75.0 hollow, Triangle hollow shape, and a 0.25-0.75 profile cut. Chopping a ring up like that results in a round object with at least three individually texturable faces visible from one direction, depending on other parameters — the limit you can twist it into would be five. By default, the texture on these faces is distorted in a non-linear fashion. However, if you switch the texture mapping to planar, on at least three of the faces the distortion will become linear, and you can use a rotated flat texture to create a clock face and a minutes and seconds hand with no unusual scripting required.

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